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  • Writer's pictureCliff L'Aimable _Chartered Surveyor & Building Engineer

Cheaper hot water using heat pumps.

Updated: Jan 27, 2023

Another Blog Post from Cliff L'Aimable who has been writing construction related blog posts since 1999 and was an ex-article writer with technical publications appearing in Trinity Mirror magazines and newspapers in his column called the "Property Doctor"




Key Benefits

Introduction


Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps

Are you looking for an energy efficient and cost-effective way to heat your home's hot water? Domestic water heat pumps (DWHP) are a great option.


These systems use renewable sources of energy, such as air or ground source heat, instead of relying on burning fossil fuels. In addition to being more efficient than traditional gas-fired hot water heater systems, they also require less maintenance and have a longer life span. Read on to learn more about the benefits of domestic water heat pumps!


Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps
Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps


1. Domestic water heat pumps (DWHP) are more efficient than gas fired hot water heater

Domestic water heat pumps (DWHP) are a great option for homeowners looking to reduce energy consumption and utility bills. Heat pumps use renewable sources of energy, such as air or ground source heat, instead of burning fossil fuels. When compared to traditional gas-fired hot water heater systems, domestic water heat pumps can be up to 30% more efficient in terms of energy usage. This means that households could save money on their monthly bills by switching over to a domestic water heat pump system. Furthermore, these systems require less maintenance than gas-fired hot water heater systems and have a longer lifespan too!


Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps
Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps


2. DWHP can reduce energy consumption and utility bills

DWHP can reduce energy consumption by up to 30% when compared to traditional gas-fired hot water heater systems. This means that households could save money on their monthly bills by switching to a DWHP system -which is now even more important during this energy crisis period.


Benefit : Not only do these systems use renewable sources of energy, but they also require less maintenance than gas-fired hot water heaters, reducing the cost of repairs.

Benefit : Additionally, DWHP systems have a longer lifespan than their gas-fired counterparts, meaning that they are less likely to need repairs or replacements over time.


Benefit : DWHP use renewable energy sources such as air or ground source heat, they are more environmentally friendly than burning fossil fuels.


Benefit : Lastly, these DWHP systems are quieter than traditional hot water heater systems so you can enjoy your home without the noise pollution of a noisy gas boiler running all day long.


All in all, investing in a domestic water heat pump is an efficient way to reduce energy consumption and utility costs while also helping the environment.


Refrigerant used in the heat pump : Domestic heat pumps typically use R290 refrigerant, which is extensively used in other home products like residential fridge freezers.


Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps
Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps

R290 allows the hot water heat pump system to easily produce up to 60° in the cylinder quite quickly without the use of a backup heater while maintaining high-efficiency levels.


Some of the best models of DWHP only consume between a miserly 10W to 250W to produce hot water for your baths and showers, and when coupled to a timer to take benefit of cheap rate electricity tariffs keeps more of your money in your pockets.


Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps
Building Inspector blog: Hot water heat pumps


: A tip to look out for when choosing a DWHP unit is its "coefficient of performance" (COP). Spend a little more to get a unit with a COP of 3.4 and above if you can. Typically though a DWHP with a COP of 2 to 3.5 provides a heating output typically 2 to 3.5 times more than the power input, or an efficiency of 200% to 350%, depending on the ambient temperature outside, a heat pump's performance can vary greatly based upon the location of the unit, therefore the DWHP's location should not be placed in locations that could be subject to large temperature variations is.


As always for private sector based building regulation approvals and inspections contact us by calling tel : 01992 710 763 Email support@bcsurv.com for competitive fee quotes visit our website at www.bcsurv.com Blog post written by Cliff L'Aimable Chartered Surveyor a member of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and a Registered Chartered Building Engineer.

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